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  • Nicki Reisberg

Stand Up For Kids (with Josh Golin)



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Show Notes


Parents have it rough. There is no perfect option when it comes to our kids and tech. But there is hope!


Today's conversation features Josh Golin of Fairplay, who is working to enhance children's wellbeing by eliminating the exploitative and harmful business practices of marketers and Big Tech.


We discuss the reality of parenting in today's digital world, from tech in schools to social media concerns to kids online safety legislation. As with all conversations on Scrolling 2 Death, I hope you walk away feeling inspired to advocate for positive change in the digital world and with confidence in the power of your voice.


Use Your Voices


Contact your Representative in the House: Visit house.gov and enter ZIP code at the top right to find your representative

Contact your Senators: Visit senate.gov and use the state drop down at the top of your screen


About Josh Golin


Josh Golin is Executive Director of Fairplay, which works to enhance children's wellbeing by eliminating the exploitative and harmful business practices of marketers and big tech. Fairplay holds companies accountable for their harmful marketing and platform design choices, and advocates for policies that both protect children when they are online and help young people get the offline time they need to thrive. Under Josh's leadership, Fairplay filed the Federal Trade Commission complaint that led to the FTC's settlement with Google for COPPA violations on YouTube and led the international campaign that stopped Meta from releasing a version of Instagram for younger kids.


Earlier this year, Fairplay, along with David's Legacy Foundation, launched ParentsSOS - an initiative of families who have lost their children to social media harms and advocate for the Kids Online Safety Act.


Josh’s media appearances include Good Morning America, NPR, and Fox & Friends and he’s regularly quoted in major publications like The New York Times and The Washington Post. He has testified twice before Congress and regularly speaks to parents, professionals, and policymakers about how to create a healthier media environment for children and teens. He lives in Vermont with his wife Jennifer, their 15-year-old daughter and their hound, Jolene.

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